Natural Color 0.26ct. Fancy Brownish Pink Round Loose Diamond

$595.00
+ $27.00 shipping

Only 1 available

$595.00
+ $27.00 shipping
In stock
Preparation takes 1-3 business days
Arrives from the United States
Returns and exchanges accepted
See this seller's return policy

Item details

Think pink! Here is a pretty natural color (NOT coated or treated) round brilliant diamond for a special ring or pendant. The color is a medium-light pink with peach and pale brown overtones typical of diamonds from the Argyle mine in Australia. The particulars:

Size: 3.95-4.06 mm in diameter by 2.45mm wide.
Weight: 0.26 ct.
Color: Natural brownish pink.
Clarity: I-1. The stone has a feather on one side which won't affect the durability- visible in the last photograph.
Cut: Good- has a lively sparkle.

This will fit any setting that takes a 4mm round stone, or we can custom design something special! Will be beautiful set in a rose gold halo ring with white diamonds.
An unbeatable price, too!

Fancy Diamond Lab Reports:
I stand behind what I sell and guarantee this stone to be as represented.
However, if you would like a G.I.A. Colored Diamond Report, I will obtain one for you for $150 when you purchase the stone. (This is my actual cost for the report and shipping/insurance both ways.) The process takes about three weeks.
The report will test for natural vs. synthetic diamond and natural vs. treated color. It does not grade for clarity nor determine the geographic origin of the stone.


FAQs

Yes. Please request layaway through Etsy conversations for details.

Yes, once you have purchased a stone; I will be happy to work with you on a custom designed setting for it.

I make every effort to be sure that photographs are accurate- but two things will affect how the stone looks to you: First, each monitor and screen displays color differently, so the color on your monitor might not represent the actual color of the stone. Second, the apparent color of many gemstones varies with the type of light (daylight, incandescent, fluorescent, LED) you are viewing it in; and some types are more flattering than others! View the stone under several light sources to see the full color range.

If you'd like a formal gemological laboratory report, I can obtain one from the G.I.A. (Gemological Institute of America) or A.G.L. (American Gemological Laboratories) on your behalf. We will charge you the actual cost plus shipping, handling and insurance. Please inquire for a price quote and estimated turnaround time; prices vary with the type of report and the size of the stone.

Paraiba tourmaline is colored an intense "Windex" blue from copper content. First discovered in Paraiba, Brazil it was introduced in the late 1980's in Tucson. I was there, and bought all I could afford! The price was considered outrageous, rising above $1000 a carat. The best of these early crystals were large, clean, and colored a deep ultramarine blue through intense green with a "glow". (Heat was used even then to bring out the blue color.) This material became so valuable that people were literally killed for it! In a few years the original mines were worked out, and supply dried up to a trickle. If one of these gems becomes available, it easily commands six figures. (I know where to find them if you want one!)

Larger deposits of copper-bearing tourmaline were discovered later in Nigeria and Mozambique. These are more plentiful than the Brazilian stone, less included, and less expensive. The color is pretty; but only rarely has the saturation and "glow" that the Brazilian tourmaline has. So, what am I selling? A few people kept and didn't cut the more included Brazilian rough. This is being cut now, and there is still not a lot of it. My stones are from this source; they are Brazilian, and they have inclusions- but they will be as beautiful a blue as I can find. I am trying to offer stones that will allow those who aren't millionaires to actually own a true Brazilian Paraiba tourmaline.

Paraiba tourmaline is a hydrothermal mineral: The crystals grew in hot liquid, leaving distinctive birthmarks in the stone: "Trichites" are hair-thin nets of cavities; "growth tubes" are hollow tubes that form along the crystal axis, fractures are splits that occur across the crystal. When the crystal changes direction growth planes are visible. Guest minerals are other minerals contained in the crystal. Many fractures "heal" themselves (partially or fully) as solution crystallize within them. In most stones available today, these inclusions are small, but numerous. When the stone is cut, they are bisected; leaving tiny holes on the surface. The cleaner the stone is, the more it will cost, but they all will make great jewelry.

It is safe to assume that ALL Paraiba tourmaline has been oiled, since the rough is stored in it before it's cut and oil used as a lubricant during cutting, so I always say "oiled"! This oil is colorless, usually cedar oil. If the inclusions in the stone are small, the pores in the stone's cut surface will be shallow. The oil can not penetrate into the stone and so does not have much (if any) effect on the clarity. The biggest effect will be in stones with larger fractures, but there are not likely to be more than one or two of these in a given stone. Oil affects the appearance but not the value, a clean stone will always be more valuable than an included one, oil or not. The problem is when oil is used but not disclosed to the buyer.

Paraiba tourmaline has with very few exceptions always been routinely heated to improve the blue color; with the possible exception of more included material due to the danger of breakage. The heat used is fairly low compared to that used for ruby and sapphire, and can not always be detected, even by a gemological lab. Because of this, most labs simply say "Paraiba tourmaline may be routinely heated" to cover all bases.

No, the Paraiba tourmalines I sell are not filled with hard resin or glass.

Yes. Please request layaway through Etsy conversations for details.

Yes, once you have purchased a stone; I will be happy to work with you on a custom designed setting for it.

I make every effort to be sure that photographs are accurate- but two things will affect how the stone looks to you: First, each monitor and screen displays color differently, so the color on your monitor might not represent the actual color of the stone. Second, the apparent color of many gemstones varies with the type of light (daylight, incandescent, fluorescent, LED) you are viewing it in; and some types are more flattering than others! View the stone under several light sources to see the full color range.

If you'd like a formal gemological laboratory report, I can obtain one from the G.I.A. (Gemological Institute of America) or A.G.L. (American Gemological Laboratories) on your behalf. We will charge you the actual cost plus shipping, handling and insurance. Please inquire for a price quote and estimated turnaround time; prices vary with the type of report and the size of the stone.

Paraiba tourmaline is colored an intense "Windex" blue from copper content. First discovered in Paraiba, Brazil it was introduced in the late 1980's in Tucson. I was there, and bought all I could afford! The price was considered outrageous, rising above $1000 a carat. The best of these early crystals were large, clean, and colored a deep ultramarine blue through intense green with a "glow". (Heat was used even then to bring out the blue color.) This material became so valuable that people were literally killed for it! In a few years the original mines were worked out, and supply dried up to a trickle. If one of these gems becomes available, it easily commands six figures. (I know where to find them if you want one!)

Larger deposits of copper-bearing tourmaline were discovered later in Nigeria and Mozambique. These are more plentiful than the Brazilian stone, less included, and less expensive. The color is pretty; but only rarely has the saturation and "glow" that the Brazilian tourmaline has. So, what am I selling? A few people kept and didn't cut the more included Brazilian rough. This is being cut now, and there is still not a lot of it. My stones are from this source; they are Brazilian, and they have inclusions- but they will be as beautiful a blue as I can find. I am trying to offer stones that will allow those who aren't millionaires to actually own a true Brazilian Paraiba tourmaline.

Paraiba tourmaline is a hydrothermal mineral: The crystals grew in hot liquid, leaving distinctive birthmarks in the stone: "Trichites" are hair-thin nets of cavities; "growth tubes" are hollow tubes that form along the crystal axis, fractures are splits that occur across the crystal. When the crystal changes direction growth planes are visible. Guest minerals are other minerals contained in the crystal. Many fractures "heal" themselves (partially or fully) as solution crystallize within them. In most stones available today, these inclusions are small, but numerous. When the stone is cut, they are bisected; leaving tiny holes on the surface. The cleaner the stone is, the more it will cost, but they all will make great jewelry.

It is safe to assume that ALL Paraiba tourmaline has been oiled, since the rough is stored in it before it's cut and oil used as a lubricant during cutting, so I always say "oiled"! This oil is colorless, usually cedar oil. If the inclusions in the stone are small, the pores in the stone's cut surface will be shallow. The oil can not penetrate into the stone and so does not have much (if any) effect on the clarity. The biggest effect will be in stones with larger fractures, but there are not likely to be more than one or two of these in a given stone. Oil affects the appearance but not the value, a clean stone will always be more valuable than an included one, oil or not. The problem is when oil is used but not disclosed to the buyer.

Paraiba tourmaline has with very few exceptions always been routinely heated to improve the blue color; with the possible exception of more included material due to the danger of breakage. The heat used is fairly low compared to that used for ruby and sapphire, and can not always be detected, even by a gemological lab. Because of this, most labs simply say "Paraiba tourmaline may be routinely heated" to cover all bases.

No, the Paraiba tourmalines I sell are not filled with hard resin or glass.



Reviews
No reviews yet

More from this seller

Shipping & policies
Preparation takes 1-3 business days
Arrives from the United States
Estimated Shipping
Shipping to
Zip or postal code
Customs and import taxes
Buyers are responsible for any customs and import taxes that may apply. I'm not responsible for delays due to customs.

Payments
Secure options
  • Pay with Visa
  • Pay with Master Card
  • Pay with American Express
  • Pay with Discover
  • Pay with PayPal
Etsy Studio keeps your payment information secure. Etsy Studio shops never receive your credit card information.
Other options
Etsy Studio can't guarantee the security of these options. For details on how to pay with these methods, contact me.
  • Other Method

Returns & exchanges
I gladly accept returns and exchanges
Just contact me within: 14 days of delivery
Ship items back to me within: 30 days of delivery
I don't accept cancellations
But please contact me if you have any problems with your order.
The following items can't be returned or exchanged
Because of the nature of these items, unless they arrive damaged or defective, I can't accept returns for:
  • Custom or personalized orders
  • Digital downloads
  • Items on sale
Conditions of return
Buyers are responsible for return shipping costs. If the item is not returned in its original condition, the buyer is responsible for any loss in value.