Antique Drawer Pulls, Cast Iron Eastlake Russell & Erwin "Belt Buckle" Design, Price per Each, ca 1875

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Vintage

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This is a gorgeous and highly detailed (and rare) cast iron Buckle pattern Eastlake era antique drawer pull manufactured by Russell & Erwin in about 1875. These pulls measure 4-5/8" x 1=1/2" with the screwholes at almost 4" o.c.. These pulls are in excellent condition with most of the original black background intact. At posting I have 8 each and price is per unit.


FAQs

I can customize many of my offerings. Just let me know what you might like matched with what and I will see what I can do. Or if you like to batch some orders, I can help with freight as well. I can measure knob shaft diameters, door plate knob holes, and suggest various design combinations. Whatever information or help you need, just ask.

Cast bronze/brass or iron door knobs are often called solid knobs because they feel so much heavier than today's hardware. They are actually hollow, but have very thick metal bodies and solid shanks. Bronze and Brass knobs wear well, do not rust, and they can be cast with very ornate designs. Late Eastlake knobs can be a thinner metal and less weight, and less face design detail. As we move into 1900, we move to stamped wrought iron, then on to stamped sheet iron. Progressively knobs and hardware got lighter, with less design and craftsmanship, until we have today's high production products. Victorian/Eastlake hardware is a great investment that will certainly keep working for another 100-plus years. Craftsmanship for generations to come!

Well, what (the Eastlake Era - 1870 to 1900) is actually a Who as well. The era was named after an English architect, Charles Eastlake. The era is often applied to a style of interior decorating, furniture, and art. It also applies to late-Victorian hardware. These years were the height of design and craftsmanship for daily use cast metal hardware. Eastlake era designs are noted for a mix of vernacular (natural) and geometric designs and patterns. Flowers and leaves of plants and trees were often represented. Geometric patterns that look like Greek, Asian, Egyptian or Arabic figures were regularly used. Eastlake designs can be funky, folkart-like, or just unique...but they do not have the Victorian extra-frilly and curly grandiose look.

Most Victorian and Eastlake era door knobs come in a standard Passage size (interior doors). These knobs usually are 2" to 2-1/4" in diameter. Medium and higher-end knobs also came in an Entry size, usually around 2-1/4" or larger. Since there typically was only one Entry knob per house (and many times none at all), Entry knobs are difficult to obtain, and fetch a higher cost...but sure make a statement if you can find one.

In the later 1800's, most door knobs were manufactured of cast bronze. Bronze (combo of copper, tin and other mystery metals) is a harder alloy than brass (copper and zinc). Bronze is preferred for higher wear/ lower corrosion applications. Bronze alloys have a red, brown, or green patina, often with a deep flakey unpolished surface appearance, and polish a bit duller than brass. Brass leans more toward green patinas and polishes super bright (due to the high zinc content). In about 1870 the technique of compression casting came about. This led to very deep, intricate design details which were at their best throughout the 1880's. Toward the 1900's mass production led to stamped wrought and then rolled metals, as well as plated finishes.

If you need a cool antique knob for use as a Dummy Knob (knobs that don't actuate/turn and are just for Pull use) for room or cabinet doors, I can provide those for you. The knob will need a fitted door plate or rosette matched to it because the plate/rosette is the mounting mechanism. Through a secret process (can't give away all of my research) I connect the knob to the plate/rosette, creating a robust Dummy Knob assembly. In light/medium applications in solid core doors it will be fine installing the the assembly with standard wood screws (depth would be door-thickness dependent). In more robust applications (or on hollow core doors) the assembly may have to be attached via through hole screws and washers/nuts on the back side. Voila!

We have so many creative clients! You send us photos of where our Dummy Knobs get used...it is awesome to see them as Coat Hooks, as Towel and Washcloth Hooks, as Curtain Tie-Backs, or as very cool Wall Art! I know that in my house, I enjoy seeing a pair of wonderful Eastlake period knobs on the wall, just hanging there and looking pretty...always brightens up my day!

I have had many questions as to whether my antique dummy knobs can be used on hollow core doors, mostly on closet doors. The answer is YES. Hollow core doors typically have an interior piece of solid wood called a "Lock Block". This is located where door hardware would normally be located. If you mount your Dummy Knob in that zone, all will be well. Again, always make sure to use the deepest screws that you can (but don't go through the other side!).

The widest price range applies mostly to antique cast, wrought or stamped bronze/brass/iron door knobs. The first value consideration is the rareness of the piece...fewer available, higher cost. The second is the actual quality of the design and casting of the unit...the finer and more detailed, the higher the cost. Third is the overall condition of the piece...the fewer flaws, the higher the price. As well, the patina (color and uniformity) will add to the value of the piece. All of these factors also apply to the door plates as well. There is a small industry of antique door knob collectors and sellers, many of whom have had years of experience. There are no "standard prices", but as with most antiques, there is always a market!

I can customize many of my offerings. Just let me know what you might like matched with what and I will see what I can do. Or if you like to batch some orders, I can help with freight as well. I can measure knob shaft diameters, door plate knob holes, and suggest various design combinations. Whatever information or help you need, just ask.

Cast bronze/brass or iron door knobs are often called solid knobs because they feel so much heavier than today's hardware. They are actually hollow, but have very thick metal bodies and solid shanks. Bronze and Brass knobs wear well, do not rust, and they can be cast with very ornate designs. Late Eastlake knobs can be a thinner metal and less weight, and less face design detail. As we move into 1900, we move to stamped wrought iron, then on to stamped sheet iron. Progressively knobs and hardware got lighter, with less design and craftsmanship, until we have today's high production products. Victorian/Eastlake hardware is a great investment that will certainly keep working for another 100-plus years. Craftsmanship for generations to come!

Well, what (the Eastlake Era - 1870 to 1900) is actually a Who as well. The era was named after an English architect, Charles Eastlake. The era is often applied to a style of interior decorating, furniture, and art. It also applies to late-Victorian hardware. These years were the height of design and craftsmanship for daily use cast metal hardware. Eastlake era designs are noted for a mix of vernacular (natural) and geometric designs and patterns. Flowers and leaves of plants and trees were often represented. Geometric patterns that look like Greek, Asian, Egyptian or Arabic figures were regularly used. Eastlake designs can be funky, folkart-like, or just unique...but they do not have the Victorian extra-frilly and curly grandiose look.

Most Victorian and Eastlake era door knobs come in a standard Passage size (interior doors). These knobs usually are 2" to 2-1/4" in diameter. Medium and higher-end knobs also came in an Entry size, usually around 2-1/4" or larger. Since there typically was only one Entry knob per house (and many times none at all), Entry knobs are difficult to obtain, and fetch a higher cost...but sure make a statement if you can find one.

In the later 1800's, most door knobs were manufactured of cast bronze. Bronze (combo of copper, tin and other mystery metals) is a harder alloy than brass (copper and zinc). Bronze is preferred for higher wear/ lower corrosion applications. Bronze alloys have a red, brown, or green patina, often with a deep flakey unpolished surface appearance, and polish a bit duller than brass. Brass leans more toward green patinas and polishes super bright (due to the high zinc content). In about 1870 the technique of compression casting came about. This led to very deep, intricate design details which were at their best throughout the 1880's. Toward the 1900's mass production led to stamped wrought and then rolled metals, as well as plated finishes.

If you need a cool antique knob for use as a Dummy Knob (knobs that don't actuate/turn and are just for Pull use) for room or cabinet doors, I can provide those for you. The knob will need a fitted door plate or rosette matched to it because the plate/rosette is the mounting mechanism. Through a secret process (can't give away all of my research) I connect the knob to the plate/rosette, creating a robust Dummy Knob assembly. In light/medium applications in solid core doors it will be fine installing the the assembly with standard wood screws (depth would be door-thickness dependent). In more robust applications (or on hollow core doors) the assembly may have to be attached via through hole screws and washers/nuts on the back side. Voila!

We have so many creative clients! You send us photos of where our Dummy Knobs get used...it is awesome to see them as Coat Hooks, as Towel and Washcloth Hooks, as Curtain Tie-Backs, or as very cool Wall Art! I know that in my house, I enjoy seeing a pair of wonderful Eastlake period knobs on the wall, just hanging there and looking pretty...always brightens up my day!

I have had many questions as to whether my antique dummy knobs can be used on hollow core doors, mostly on closet doors. The answer is YES. Hollow core doors typically have an interior piece of solid wood called a "Lock Block". This is located where door hardware would normally be located. If you mount your Dummy Knob in that zone, all will be well. Again, always make sure to use the deepest screws that you can (but don't go through the other side!).

The widest price range applies mostly to antique cast, wrought or stamped bronze/brass/iron door knobs. The first value consideration is the rareness of the piece...fewer available, higher cost. The second is the actual quality of the design and casting of the unit...the finer and more detailed, the higher the cost. Third is the overall condition of the piece...the fewer flaws, the higher the price. As well, the patina (color and uniformity) will add to the value of the piece. All of these factors also apply to the door plates as well. There is a small industry of antique door knob collectors and sellers, many of whom have had years of experience. There are no "standard prices", but as with most antiques, there is always a market!


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    (1)
    Thank you! I love these!
    Jun 19, 2018 by rustywoman1

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Preparation takes 1-3 business days
Arrives from the United States
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