Make This: Woven Shoe Clips

Make a set of fashion-forward woven shoe clips with this tutorial from textile artist Maryanne Moodie.

Skill Level

Beginner

Time

1 hour or less

Skill level
Beginner
Time
1 hour or less
Written By

Maryanne Moodie

Maryanne Moodie

Written By

Maryanne Moodie

Maryanne Moodie

Pom poms, woven patches, and fluffy poufs have been popping up on the feet of the uber cool fashion set – but why pay over $300 when you can make your own for far less? In this tutorial, you'll learn how to make your own shoe clips to match each and every outfit, or layer them for a fun look.

You will need

You might already have

Cardboard
 

Step 1: Warp your loom

Begin making your shoe clips by first warping your loom. Tip: You may want to measure your shoe or determine the width of your shoelaces to figure out the size of your shoe clip weaving. We made ours 1.5 in. / 4 cm. across. This resulted in a dense warp.
 

Step 2: Add a spacer

Weave a piece of cardboard into the warp over and under and slip to the bottom of the loom. This will act as a spacer to give you enough room to cut and weave the ends in when you're done. Next, weave in your weaving sword at the other end of the loom (optional).
 

Step 3: Cut thread

Cut a piece of embroidery floss approximately 2 ft. / 60 cm. long. Fold it in half and loop the first warp on the right hand side.
 

Step 4: Create a row of double half hitches

Create a row of double half hitches. This creates a barrier and holds your weaving together. Create a double half hitch by making a capital D shape with the doubled thread, then pass the live end over the warp and back through the middle of the "D". Make another on the same warp before moving onto the next wap.
 

Step 5: Weave

Begin weaving (using a basic tabby stitch) the rest of the warp thread tail from left to right, over and under until you return to the right hand side. Tip: Be sure to bubble on every pass (create a little "bubble" by allowing the weft thread to be pulled up and then down on each pass - this will help keep good tension and stop you from pulling too tightly). Weave basic tabby on the next row from right to left in the opposite sequence to the row below. Continue to approximately eight rows, then weave your ends back into the weaving and tuck the tails away.
 

Step 6: Add rya knots

Next, make your tassels, also known as “rya” knots. To do this, cut about 10 lengths of string measuring 3 in. / 8 cm. in each color group. (We cut 7 groups to create 7 tassels.) Next, hold each bunch over two warp threads. Pass the left side around the back and through the middle and then the right side around the back and through the middle. Pull down on tail ends. Lock this row in with about 8 rows of tabby and weave your ends in. If you like, you can create another row of rya tassels to create a layered look or continue with tabby.
 

Step 7: Lock it all together

When you are happy with your length and design, you will need to lock your work in with another row of double half hitches (as described in Step 5). Weave your ends in and tuck them into the back.
 

Step 8: Remove weaving from loom

Cut your weave off the loom leaving about 1-2 in. / 2.5 - 5 cm. of warp. Take your tapestry needle and weave these warps back in vertically in the back of your weave. Be sure to do both the top and the bottom of your weave.
 

Step 9: Attach shoe clip

Thread your sewing needle with cotton thread and position the shoe clip on the back of your weave close to the top. Use the holes in the shoe clip to sew the clip onto your weave. Repeat so that you have two shoe clips, one for each shoe.
 

Step 10: Put the shoe clips on your shoes – ready to wear!

Now your shoe clips are all done and ready to wear. Choose the shoes you want to clip them onto and you're all set! Tip: Make more than one pair and layer them for a fun and interesting look.

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About the Author
Maryanne Moodie

Maryanne Moodie is a textile artist and teacher who divides her time between her studios in Brooklyn, NY and Melbourne, Australia. She has been teaching for almost 20 years and loves sharing her passion for weaving with new and exciting results.